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Movies for Members

QAGOMA Members also receive major discounts to paid cinema programs.

MOVIES FOR MEMBERS PRESENTS FILMS SELECTED BY MEMBERS, FOR MEMBERS

Tell us what you want to see on the big screen!

Email members@qagoma.qld.gov.au with the title of a film you'd like to see at GOMA and your reason why. Staff will use these suggestions to select next season's films. For each name you provide, you go in the draw to win coffee and cake for two at the QAG Cafe.

<em>GETTIN’ SQUARE</em> 2003 M

GETTIN’ SQUARE 2003 M

Sunday 24 August | 11.00am | GOMA

35MM, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, 100 MINUTES, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: JONATHAN TEPLITSKY

Free / No bookings required; places are limited; please arrive early to secure your seat

A stylish, criminal caper set on the Gold Coast, Gettin' Square stars Sam Worthington as Barry Wirth, who claims to have been sent to prison for a murder he did not commit. After eight years behind bars, Wirth is out on parole and ready to 'get square'. He is joined be his best friend, Johnny 'Spit' Spitieri (David Wenham), a drug addict who injects the film with a superb, show-stealing comedic performance. With his family and friends still immersed in the criminal underworld, Wirth must hatch a plan to hold on to his new job as a chef to keep everyone out of jail.

Suggested by Barbara Carseldine:
'I would like to see Gettin' Square, a Queensland movie that came out in 2003 and one of the best Australian comedies ever.'
<em>PRIDE AND PREJUDICE</em> 1940 PG

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE 1940 PG

Sunday 28 September | 11.00am | GOMA

35MM, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, 100 MINUTES, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: JONATHAN TEPLITSKY

Free / No bookings required; places are limited; please arrive early to secure your seat

In true MGM style, Robert Z Leonard’s Pride and Prejudice is an opulent and entertaining — if historically inaccurate — adaptation of one of Jane Austen's best known novels. Greer Garson sparkles as Elizabeth, one of five daughters blessed with an incorrigible, husband-hunting mother. A performance well matched by Laurence Olivier’s portrayal of the conceited yet incredibly wealthy Mr Darcy. The art direction by Cedric Gibbons and Paul Groesse deservedly earned an Academy Award in 1941.

Suggested by Diana Ross:
'As a young person I remember watching this film with my mother and I have such wonderful memories of the film.'
<em>TOP HAT</em> 1935 G

TOP HAT 1935 G

Sunday 26 October | 11.00am | GOMA

35MM, BLACK AND WHITE, MONO, 101 MINUTES, USA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: MARK SANDRICH

Free / No bookings required; places are limited; please arrive early to secure your seat

Set to an Irving Berlin score tailored to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, Top Hat delights with spectacular performances, a story of unrequited love and mistaken identity, and touches of screwball comedy. American entertainer Jerry Travers (Astaire) is mistaken for a married man by the wealthy Dale Tremont (Rogers), who is on holiday in London. The confusion unravels through fantastic dance numbers and Travers’s affections slowly emerge as reciprocated by Tremont, much to the despair of her jealous suitor, Alberto Beddini (Erik Rhodes).

Suggested by Robyn Foster:
‘Top Hat is all singing, all dancing, simple and elegant black-and-white 1930s escapism. Fred puts on his top hat, white-tie and tails to dance cheek-to-cheek with Ginger in her iconic feathered dress (which Fred famously hated and almost stopped filming over).’
<em>THE TREE OF LIFE</em> 2011 PG

THE TREE OF LIFE 2011 PG

Sunday 23 November | 11.00am | GOMA

35MM, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, 139 MINUTES, USA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: TERRENCE MALICK

Free / No bookings required; places are limited; please arrive early to secure your seat

The Tree of Life is an allusive story of an American family in the 1950s. The film follows the emotional arc of eldest son Jack (Sean Penn), who throughout his life has struggled with a complicated relationship with his father (Brad Pitt). Jack and his family play as a backdrop for the more complex question of the film, the origin of our existence. Terrence Malick’s piece is operatic and meditative; we see how both brute nature and divine grace form not only our own reality as individuals, but of all life.

Suggested by Robyn Foster:
‘I saw The Tree of Life on a long-haul flight some time ago; it struck me as a visually beautiful and emotionally rich film which I think other people would like to view, or re-view as much as I would. I loved the weaving of everyday human moments – tender recollections and raw memories – with images of the whole sphere of life.’

If you love films – be sure to check out the incredible program at the Gallery's Australian Cinémathèque, at GOMA, on the Cinema pages of our website.