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Anita Fontaine

Anita Fontaine, CuteXDoom II 2008 (1)

Anita Fontaine
CuteXDoom II 2008 (production still)
Image courtesy: The artist

Anita Fontaine, CuteXDoom II 2008 (2)

Anita Fontaine
CuteXDoom II 2008 (production still)
Image courtesy: The artist

 

 

Anita Fontaine

b.1979, Nambour, Qld
Lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Anita Fontaine employs computer-game programming, 3-D modelling and animation, GPS locative gaming (using pocket PCs) and, more recently, the web-based virtual environment of Second Life as a means to invite viewers into her fantastical worlds. Often interactive, Fontaine’s work allows us to be both a participant and a spectator. CuteXdoom II presents the second level of the computer game modification CuteXdoom, first exhibited in 2004. In the first level of this game, the avatar (virtual character) ‘Sally Sanrio’ becomes intrigued by a popular and ‘supermodern’ religious cult called CuteXdoom, the followers of which believe ‘the possession and worship of cute material objects will ultimately lead to happiness’. Separating itself from the plethora of violent shoot-em-up videogames, CuteXdoom drew on the imagery and paraphernalia of kawaii (Japanese aesthetic of ‘cute’) and otaku (obsessive fan-based culture of anime and computer games). CuteXdoom II continues these themes by further exploring ideas of obsession and fanatical ideologies.

In Fontaine’s new level of the game, the world becomes increasingly surreal and distorted when ‘Sally’ realises she has been poisoned. Players must fight the effects of the poison in order to find the antidote and to achieve freedom beyond the confines of the cult.

Anita Fontaine works in the realm of interactive media and animation, creating surreal and engaging works that readdress and expand the parameters of media art and gaming culture. Fontaine graduated from the Queensland College of Art and has exhibited nationally at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne; and the National Portrait Gallery, Canberra. In 2004 she undertook a residency at the Banff New Media Institute in Canada, designing location-based mobile experiences.