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Callum Morton

Callum_Morton_Silverscreen_2006.jpg

Callum Morton | Australia b.1965 | Silverscreen 2006 | Wood, aluminium and synthetic polymer paint |167.6 x 180 x 90cm (complete); screen: 92.9 x 110 x 45.3cm; table: 74.7 x 180 x 90cm | Purchased 2007. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation | Collection: Queensland Art Gallery

 Callum Morton Silverscreen 2006

Callum Morton
Australia  b.1965
Silverscreen 2006
Wood, aluminium and synthetic polymer paint
167.6 x 180 x 90cm (complete); screen: 92.9 x 110 x 45.3cm; table: 74.7 x 180 x 90cm
Purchased 2007. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation
Collection: Queensland Art Gallery

Callum Morton

Silverscreen 2006

Callum Morton makes architectural-style models that set familiar buildings and forms from architectural history against their original, often idealised purposes, in order to tell a hidden or darker story. To create his scaled models, Morton employs contemporary computer skills, similar to those used by both computer game designers and architects. His work elaborates on a global tendency in art and architecture, and aesthetics generally, towards an international style, originally emanating from Europe and North America and influencing a wide variety of regional practices.

Silverscreen is from a series of sculptures inspired by the outdoor cinema screen. The drive-in cinema equates to the golden age of Modernism — an era of Western consumer affluence — and the diffusion of Western cultural forms around the globe. The beautiful construction and sculptural qualities of Silverscreen are undermined by the pitted and degraded aluminium plates that make up its surface, which is peppered with bullet-like holes, like a vandalised outback road sign. As with his other scaled models, Morton explores themes of destruction, decay and visual representation in this work. He subtly subverts the structure on which our dreams, fears and desires are projected. However, no images will or can be projected on this surface, and this model can never recapture the projected cellular dreams of the original.