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Yayoi culture

Yayoi_culture_Jar_400BCE300BCE_Yayoi_period.JPG

Yayoi culture | Japan | ‘Jar’ 400–300BCE (Yayoi period) | Earthenware, hand-built spherical form with flaring lip and applied rope motif around the body | 27 x 22cm (diam.) | Purchased 2008. The Queensland Government’s Gallery of Modern Art Acquisitions Fund | Collection: Queensland Art Gallery

Yayoi culture ‘Jar’ 400BCE–300BCE (Yayoi period)
Yayoi culture
Japan
‘Jar’ 400–300BCE (Yayoi period)
Low-fired pottery
27 x 22cm (diam.)
Purchased 2008. The Queensland Government’s Gallery of Modern Art Acquisitions Fund
Collection: Queensland Art Gallery

Yayoi culture

‘Jar’ 400–300BCE (Yayoi period)

The Yayoi culture emerged in the fourth century BCE, gradually replacing the Jōmon culture. During this period, an agrarian-based society emerged in Japan, and the development of wet-rice production brought changes to the socio-economic structures and cultural practices of the time. From the early part of the Yayoi period, the ceramics found in western and eastern Japan differ markedly, the western artefacts reflecting the new styles and techniques developed under the influence of continental Asia, and the east conforming more closely to the preceding Jōmon models. Yayoi ceramics may be characterised as simpler in shape and surface decoration than the Jōmon wares. They tend to be built with finer clay and were fired to higher temperatures. During this period, ceramics also began to be made on wheels.

Rice became an important commodity during the Yayoi period as it could be accumulated and stored in jars. Status within the community was expressed by its possession, contributing to the development of a class system. This collection of ceramics from the Yayoi period is part of an important focus collection of early Japanese ceramics in the historical Asian collection.