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Coming of Age

COMING OF AGE

15 JUNE - 9 JULY 2007

One of the defining narratives in Australian cinema is the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Australian 'coming of age' films capture aspects of identity particular to recent Australian history. They engage with cultural difference, Indigenous Australia and relationships to land and place, often with heartache and humour. This program celebrates the sophisticated storytelling within this genre of Australian cinema and includes some of Australia's most acclaimed titles, directors and actors. The Australian Cinémathèque acknowledges the generous assistance of the National Film and Sound Archive, Canberra, in the preparation and presentation of the Coming of Age program

Production still from Beneath the clouds

Beneath Clouds 2002 M

2.00pm Sunday 17 June / Cinema A

35MM, 90 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: IVAN SEN / PRODUCTION COMPANY: AUTUMN FILMS / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: DENDY FILMS, AUSTRALIA

In acclaimed Australian Film Television and Radio School graduate Ivan Sen's first feature, Beneath Clouds, Lena (Danielle Hall), the daughter of an Indigenous mother and absent Irish father, hitchhikes from Moree to Sydney after another argument at home. Along the way she meets Vaughan (Damian Pitt), who has escaped from a prison farm to visit his dying mother. Lena has tasted the advantages of 'passing' for white. Vaughan is a quick-tempered malcontent. Both are altered, hardened and disillusioned by their experiences of racism. Their conversation is written across a series of compelling landscapes. At the core of this film is a quest for a safe and meaningful sense of place, captured and framed by Ivan Sen's signature visual shots of cars passing by his main characters. The director searched widely for non-professional actors who could convey the complexity of his two main characters. Danielle Hall received Best Young Actress at the Berlin International Film Festival in 2002 for her performance. ROR

Production still from Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces

Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces 1988 PG
1.00pm Sunday 8 July / Cinema A

16MM, 95 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: GILLIAN ARMSTRONG / PRODUCTION COMPANY: FILM AUSTRALIA / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: FILM AUSTRALIA

Gillian Armstrong's critically revered documentary series explores the lives of three girls — Josie, Diana and Kerry — as they mature into women. Initiated in 1975, Armstrong interviewed the women at the ages of 14 (Smokes and Lollies 1975), 18 (Fourteen's Good, Eighteen's Better 1981), 26 (Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces 1988) and 35 (Not Fourteen Again 1996), when some of the women have teenage daughters themselves. Ernest and direct, the three girls/women are engaging interviewees, as they reflect on their lives, choices and hopes for the future. A unique perspective on suburban Australia is revealed through discussions of sex, love, marriage and careers, which also subtly expose the limited roles and opportunities open to women of their generation. Often compared to Michael Apted's 7 Up series, which began in 1964, Armstrong's series was originally conceived as a stand-alone project commissioned by the South Australian Film Corporation to explore the supposedly liberated values and identities of young women in the 1970s. RH

Production still from The devils Playground

The Devil's Playground 1976 M
12 noon Wednesday 4 July / Cinema A

35MM, 107 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, ENGLISH, AUSTRALIA / DIRECTOR/SCRIPT: FRED SCHEPISI / PRODUCTION COMPANY: THE FILM HOUSE / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, FROM THE KODAK/ATLAB PROJECT, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: FRED SCHEPISI

The Devil's Playground is a powerful story of sexual and intellectual awakening set amongst the adolescent male environment of a 1950s rural Catholic seminary. Alongside the religious rituals, discipline and constraints of daily life at the seminary, these young men also grapple with their unmentionable desires. The Devil's Playground was the semi-autobiographical debut feature by Fred Schepisi who went on to make The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith 1978 before moving to Hollywood and bigger budgets with Evil Angels 1988 and Six Degrees of Separation 1994. Ian Baker's cinematography underlines the restrained sexuality of the boys' world.RH

Production still from Deluge

Deluge 2003 Ages 12+
2:00pm Sunday 30 June (with Somersault) / Cinema A

16MM, 7 MINS, B. & W., STEREO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR/SCRIPT: FLORDELIZ BONIFACIO / PRODUCTION COMPANY/PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: SECOND SIGHT PRODUCTIONS, AUSTRALIA

A father and his two sons carry out winter maintenance work at the local swimming pool. The empty pool, devoid of summer life, mirrors the loneliness of the eldest boy. With its saturated black-and-white cinematography, Deluge visually precipitates the darkness and isolation that lies in wait at certain stages of life. RH

Production still from Flirting

Flirting 1991 PG
2.00pm Saturday 16 June / Cinema A

35MM, 99 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY SR, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: JOHN DUIGAN / PRODUCTION COMPANY: KENNEDY MILLER PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: ROADSHOW FILMS, AUSTRALIA

Set in 1965, three years after the disheartening experience of first love in The Year My Voice Broke, Flirting finds the shy Danny Embling (Noah Taylor) attending an all-male boarding school in New South Wales. He becomes interested in Thandiwe Adjewa (Thandie Newton) from the girls' school across the lake. The daughter of Ugandan and Kenyan–British parents, Thandiwe is branded as brazen and rebellious by the school's religious authorities. The couple's romance blossoms over the course of the school year despite the strict regulations imposed on their relationship. Beautifully shot, the film features Nicole Kidman in her last project with director John Duigan (following the miniseries Vietnam 1987 and prior to her move to Hollywood). Flirting captures a period of white Australian boyhood, inflected with existential angst and geographic isolation, and still bearing the marks of a colonial British inheritance. Released at a time of cultural optimism and momentum surrounding reconciliation, and the ideal of a multicultural Australia, this honest and intelligent high school romance stands in contrast to Hollywood teen films of the previous decade.ROR

Production still from Fourteen's Good, Eighteen's Better

Fourteen's Good, Eighteen's Better 1981 PG
11.00am Sunday 8 July (with Smokes and Lollies) / Cinema A

16MM, 50 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: GILLIAN ARMSTRONG / PRODUCTION COMPANY: BIG PICTURE COMPANY, M & L PTY. LIMITED, FILM AUSTRALIA / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: FILM AUSTRALIA

See Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces 1988.

Production still from Head On

Head On 1998 R18+
6.00pm Friday 22 June
/ Cinema A

35MM, 104 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: ANA KOKKINOS / PRODUCTION COMPANIES: AUSTRALIAN FILM FINANCE CORPORATION, FILM VICTORIA, GREAT SCOTT PRODUCTIONS, HEAD ON PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: PALACE FILMS, AUSTRALIA

Ari (Alex Dimitriades), the handsome son of Greek immigrants, uses drugs and anonymous sex to escape familial expectations and the constraints of his suburban life. Directed by Ana Kokkinos, the film charts a desperate 24-hour period in Ari's life as he navigates his way through the inner-city streets of Melbourne — the stomping grounds of working-class migrant communities — in search of a moment of fulfilment. Paul Capsis has a commanding screen presence as Ari's cross-dressing friend Johnny/Toula. Vivacious and brave, Toula challenges the homophobia that Ari is unwilling to face. Kokkinos's frenetic visual approach features close framing, accelerated sequences and hand-held camera work to convey Ari's frustrated energies, breakneck lifestyle and drug-induced visions of his world. Adapted from the Christos Tsiolkas novel Loaded 1995, Head On was a landmark Australian film for its candid and sensual depiction of young gay experience, and its unsentimental representation of the Australian migrant experience.RH

Production still from Looking for Alibrandi

Looking for Alibrandi 2000 M
12 noon Wednesday 27 June / Cinema A

35MM, 99 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: KATE WOODS / PRODUCTION COMPANY: ROBYN KERSHAW PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: ROADSHOW FILMS, AUSTRALIA

Josie (Pia Miranda) is in her final year of high school and yearns for independence. A third-generation Italian in inner-city Sydney, she is determined to be the master of her own destiny. Josie is a scholarship-holder at a prestigious all-girls Catholic school (or a 'wog on a handout', as seen by prissy blonde Carli) and has aspirations to study law as a means of escaping a patriarchal family curse from her past. The film has been read as promoting multiculturalism for a new generation of Australian youth, linking their cultural pasts to a local or national sense of belonging. The performance of Pia Miranda carries this refreshingly optimistic cross-cultural 'coming of age' film.RH

Production still from Love and other Catastrophes

Love and other Catastrophes 1996 M
12 noon Wednesday 20 June / Cinema A

35MM, 79 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR/SCRIPT: EMMA-KATE CROGHAN / PRODUCTION COMPANY: SCREWBALL FIVE PTY LTD / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: HOPSCOTCH FILMS, AUSTRALIA

Emma-Kate Croghan's debut feature is a charming romantic comedy about the lives of twenty-something Melbourne university students and their desire for romance and independence. Alice (Alice Garner) is an incurable romantic trying desperately to complete her thesis on Doris Day as 'Feminist Warrior', and occasionally hiding under coffee tables to avoid her supervisor. Mia (Frances O'Connor) is grappling with academic bureaucracy, racing to make the final transfer date so she can take classes with cultural studies guru Adrian (Adrian Martin as himself). Mia's long-suffering girlfriend Danni (Radha Mitchell) attempts to break up with her. Michael (Matt Day) is a med-student looking for love and a place to belong while the enigmatic Ari (Matthew Dyktynski) projects an aura of sophistication to cover his insecurity. This cast of characters capture Australian romance, student life, angst and coffee culture of the 1990s.RH

Production still from Muriel's Wedding

Muriel's Wedding 1994 M
6.00pm Friday 6 July (with Titsiana Booberini) / Cinema A

35MM, 106 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: PJ HOGAN / PRODUCTION COMPANY: CIBY 2000 / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: ROADSHOW FILMS, AUSTRALIA

This delightfully parochial and subversive take on the 'ugly duckling' story incorporated real events from the life of first-time director PJ Hogan. Muriel Heslop (Toni Collette) is a gauche and overweight working-class ingenue dominated by a philandering father and chastised by pernickety beach babe girlfriends (led by a wonderfully callous Sophie Lee) who still cling to high school popularity points. Muriel has transcendental ABBA-infused visions of the change of fortune and self-esteem that a glamorous white wedding might bring. By chance she meets Rhonda (Rachel Griffiths), a fellow misfit from her past, and they leave behind their tedious lives in the fictional coastal town of Porpoise Spit and head for the bright lights of Sydney — its parties, dating scene, and promise of independence. Featuring an orchestral adaptation of 'Dancing queen', the film's international success inspired a mid-1990s revival of ABBA and propelled its two unknown lead actresses to stardom. Collette was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Actress and Griffiths won the AFI and Australian Film Critics Awards for Best Supporting Actress.ROR

Production still from My Brilliant Career

My Brilliant Career 1979 G
2.00pm Saturday 23 June / Cinema A

35MM, 95 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: GILLIAN ARMSTRONG / PRODUCTION COMPANIES: NEW SOUTH WALES FILM CORPORATION, MARGARET FINK FILMS / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, FROM THE KODAK/ATLAB PROJECT, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: MARGARET FINK FILMS, AUSTRALIA

Sybylla Melvyn (Judy Davis) has ambitions to stay unwed in order to pursue her dream of a writing career. Gillian Armstrong's first dramatic feature, My Brilliant Career, set at turn of the twentieth century, won six AFI Awards including Best Film in 1979 and screened in competition at the Cannes International Film Festival the same year. Ultimately a romance, the film captures white Australian characters not yet comfortable in a harsh landscape — seen in upper-class landowner Harry (Sam Neill) — and still clinging to the colonial past — English gentleman Frank (Robert Grubb). Between Harry and Frank is Sybylla, a woman who enjoys the challenge of her life in the bush and who dares to eschew tradition and create a life beyond breeding and marital obedience. Judy Davis gives a luminous performance which earned her Best Actress and Best Newcomer at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards in 1980.RH

no still

Not Fourteen Again 1996 PG
2.45pm Sunday 8 July / Cinema A

16MM, 108 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY A STEREO, ENGLISH, AUSTRALIA / DIRECTOR: GILLIAN ARMSTRONG / PRODUCTION COMPANY: BEYOND PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: BEYOND PRODUCTIONS

See Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces 1988.

Production still from Picnic at Hanging Rock

Picnic at Hanging Rock 1975 PG
2.00pm Sunday 24 June / Cinema A

35MM, 107 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: PETER WEIR / PRODUCTION COMPANIES: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION, BEF FILM DISTRIBUTORS, MCELROY & MCELROY, PICNIC PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: JIM MCELROY, AUSTRALIA

On Valentine's Day in 1900, a party of schoolgirls go on a picnic at the base of Hanging Rock in Victoria's rugged Mount Macedon area. During the course of the afternoon three girls and their headmistress mysteriously go missing while exploring the rock. Seduced by the mysteries of the landscape, the ethereal young women vanish without a trace in this gothic drama. The film quietly explores the resonances and repercussions of their disappearance: pubescent longing, Victorian-era female friendship, and the disconnection of the white colonial population from its adopted landscape. Based on the novel of the same title by Australian writer Joan Lindsay and shot by Oscar-winning cinematographer Russell Boyd, Picnic at Hanging Rock was Peter Weir's second feature after his 1974 debut The Cars that Ate Paris. Its release contributed to the rebirth of the Australian film industry. Interestingly, two years after Lindsay's death in 1984, a concluding chapter from an unpublished draft of the novel was released, revealing the author's vision of the girls' fate, which was widely speculated on by audiences since the film's first release. RH

Production still from Puberty Blues

Puberty Blues 1981 M
6.00pm Friday 29 June
/ Cinema A

35MM, 87 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: BRUCE BERESFORD / PRODUCTION COMPANY: LIMELIGHT PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: LIMELIGHT PRODUCTIONS AND SOUTHERN STAR, AUSTRALIA

Sue (Jad Capelja) and Debbie (Nell Schofield) are teenagers hungry for life experience and determined to break into the local surfie clique. Once accepted by the gang, they are quickly disillusioned with the passive roles of sex object and 'towel-minder' that surfie chicks fulfil. Based on the novel by Kathy Lette and Gabrielle Carey, Puberty Blues explores the seedy sides of Australian surf culture. At the time of its release, audiences were shocked with the film's frank portrayal of teenage sexual experience. Young audiences responded to the film's raw honesty and use of colloquial language. The two protagonists eventually claim the waves and question the sexism and machismo underlying the golden image of beach culture proudly exported as integral to Australian identity at the time of the film's release.RH

no still

Smokes and Lollies 1975 PG
11.00am Sunday 8 July (with Fourteen's Good, Eighteen's Better) / Cinema A

16MM, 25 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: GILLIAN ARMSTRONG / PRODUCTION COMPANY: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN FILM CORPORATION / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE / RIGHTS: FILM AUSTRALIA

See Bingo, Bridesmaids and Braces 1988.

Production still from Somersault

Somersault 2004 MA15+
2.00pm Saturday 30 June (with Deluge) / Cinema A

35MM, 106 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: CATE SHORTLAND / PRODUCTION COMPANY: RED CARPET PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: HOPSCOTCH FILMS, AUSTRALIA

In Somersault, Heidi (Abbie Cornish), a naive and resilient sixteen-year-old runs away from her suburban Canberra home when caught in a compromising situation with her mother's deadbeat boyfriend. Arriving in the ski town of Jindabyne, she finds a job at the local service station and a cheap room courtesy of a maternal hotelier (Lyn Curran). Sumptuous imagery by Robert Humphreys and a heightening of the minutiae of sensory experience (often with little relation to the unfolding narrative) distinguished this first feature by Cate Shortland from many other representations of adolescence in Australian cinema. Heidi eventually connects with Joe (Sam Worthington), a rich farmer's son ten years her senior. Joe's own estrangement from his parents and small town depression cause an intimacy to unfold between them. Shortland handles Heidi's economic and sexual vulnerability superbly. Instead of moralising or martyring the actions of her protagonist, the film captures and celebrates the confusing terrain between sex and intimacy with great sensitivity. ROR

Production still from Storm Boy

Storm Boy 1976 G
2.00pm Saturday 7 July / Cinema A

35MM, 85 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: HENRI SAFRAN / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, FROM THE KODAK/ATLAB PROJECT, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN FILM CORPORATION AND SOUTHERN STAR, AUSTRALIA

Adapted from the novel by prolific Australian writer and educator Colin Thiele (1920–2006), this classic film, set in the wide landscapes of the Coorong region of South Australia, won the AFI Award for Best Film and several international children's film festival awards (notably Moscow, Russia and Iran). Ten-year-old Mike lives with his fisherman father in an isolated corrugated iron shed near a coastal wildlife reserve. By his father's conscious design, the two have limited contact with the outside world and subsist on each day's catch — a life paralleled by Fingerbone Bill (David Gulpilil), a local Indigenous man who gives Mike the nickname 'Storm Boy'. Mike's unfolding relationship with Fingerbone Bill, and his care for a group of orphaned pelicans, teaches him about the cycles of life, and his own inevitable coming of age — a reality his father must also face. This is a simple story with sparse dialogue, a powerful musical score and superb cinematography. ROR

Production still from Three to Go

Three to Go 1969 M
12 noon Sunday 24 June
/ Cinema A

35MM, 91 MINS, B. & W., MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTORS: PETER WEIR, BRIAN HANNANT, OLIVER HOWES / PRODUCTION COMPANY: AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH FILM UNIT / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHT: FILM AUSTRALIA

Commissioned by the Australian Commonwealth Film Unit (now Film Australia) in 1969, Three to Go is a trilogy of short films exploring adolescent rebellion. Peter Wier's Michael, in which armed tanks crowd the streets of Sydney, is perhaps the best known of the three. Judy, directed by Brian Hannant, depicts a country girl's experience of city life. The third short, Toula, by Oliver Howes, charts the coming of age of a young woman of Greek migrant parents. RH

Production still from Titsiana Booberini

Titsiana Booberini 1997 G
6.00pm Friday 6 July
(with Muriel's Wedding) / Cinema A

35MM, 14 MINS, COLOUR, STEREO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: ROBERT LUKETIC / RODUCTION COMPANY: VICTORIAN COLLEGE OF THE ARTS — SCHOOL OF FILM AND TELEVISION / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: VICTORIAN COLLEGE OF THE ARTS — SCHOOL OF FILM AND TELEVISION

Titsiana Booberini (Tania Lacey) is an awkward misfit amongst her checkout co-workers at the local supermarket, and desperately dreams of popularity. The crushing banality of her day-to-day life is remedied by daydreams that transform her supermarket existence into a stage of possibility, infused with colour and musical interludes. Co-written with Tania Lacey, Titsiana Booberini was the short film that sent director Robert Luketic to a career in Hollywood. Perhaps, fittingly, Luketic went on to direct Legally Blonde 2001. RH

Production still from Walkabout

Walkabout 1971 M
2.00pm Sunday 1 July / Cinema A

35MM, 100 MINS, COLOUR, MONO, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH AND MANDHALPUYNGU / DIRECTOR: NICOLAS ROEG / PRODUCTION COMPANIES: 20TH CENTURY FOX, SI LITVINOFF FILM PRODUCTION / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX, AUSTRALIA

A teenage girl and her younger brother (Jenny Agutter and Lucien John) find themselves alone in the outback after their mentally ill father drives them to a remote location for a picnic then commits suicide. Scared and unable to find their way back home, the brother and sister are rescued by a young Indigenous man (David Gulpilil in his acting debut) on 'walkabout' — a rite of passage in which a young man must journey through the bush alone. The three characters fall into 'naturalistic' roles of mother, father and child; and the little boy learns how to bridge the language divide between his sister and the young Indigenous man. Roeg's critique of notions of civilised and uncivilised behaviour romanticises 'traditional' Indigenous culture. In a vivid sequence, Nicolas Roeg inter-cuts Gulpilil hunting with images of a suburban butcher chopping and wrapping offal. The privileged perspective of the young white woman protagonist problematises the constraints of both cultures. RH

Production still from The Year My Voice Broke

The Year My Voice Broke 1987 M
6.00pm Friday 15 June
/ Cinema A

35MM, 103 MINS, COLOUR, DOLBY, AUSTRALIA, ENGLISH / DIRECTOR: JOHN DUIGAN / PRODUCTION COMPANY: KENNEDY MILLER PRODUCTIONS / PRINT SOURCE: NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE, FROM THE KODAK/ATLAB PROJECT, CANBERRA / RIGHTS: KENNEDY MILLER

Set in 1962, this poignant story of adolescent yearning launched the careers of its teenage cast and is recognised by critics and audiences as one of the best Australian new wave films of the 1980s. The awkward and intelligent Danny Embling (Noah Taylor) falls in love with his best friend Freya (Loene Carmen), a mesmerising misfit who is enamoured of local troublemaker and footy hero Trevor (Ben Mendelsohn). Danny's narration of his nascent sexuality in the cultural terrain of a 1960s regional Australian town is lyrical and disarming. As Freya's sexual explorations see her slip further from Danny's grasp, a series of events irreversibly affect their friendship and future. Shot in and around the beautiful New South Wales town of Braidwood, its landscapes overlaid with strains of 'The lark ascending' by English composer Vaughn Williams, the film won Best Film at the 1987 Australian Film Institute Awards. ROR

The following film prints were borrowed from the National Film and Sound Archive Canberra: The Devil's Playground, Flirting, Muriel's Wedding, My Brilliant Career, Picnic at Hanging Rock, Puberty Blues, Storm Boy, Titsiana Booberini, Walkabout, The Year My Voice Broke.

Nation film and Sound Archive

Coming of Agecurated by Rosie Hays, with accompanying film notes by Rosie Hays (RH) and Rachel O'Reilly (ROR).