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Tracey Moffatt: Spirited

2 & 22 November 2014
Australian Cinémathèque | Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA)
FREE

Selected by artist Tracey Moffatt, John Ford’s celebrated film The Quiet Man 1952 starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara screens in conjunction with the ‘Tracey Moffatt: Spirited’ exhibition at GOMA (25 October 2014 – 8 February 2015). The exhibition showcases her recent major body of work ‘Spirited Landscapes’ 2013, comprising five photographic series and a moving image work, presented alongside works selected by Moffatt from the QAGOMA Collection which variously speak to a spiritual relationship to place.

John Ford
The quiet man 1952  PG

The quiet man 1952 PG

Sun 2 Nov 2.30pm (remind me) and Sun 2 Nov 11.00am (remind me) Cinema A

35MM, COLOUR (TECHNICOLOR), 1.37:1, MONO (RCA SOUND SYSTEM), 129 MINUTES, UNITED STATES, ENGLISH/IRISH GAELIC / DIRECTOR: JOHN FORD / SCRIPT: FRANK S NUGENT / BASED ON THE STORY BY MAURICE WALSH / CINEMATOGRAPHER: WINTON C HOCH / EDITOR: JACK MURRAY / MUSIC: VICTOR YOUNG / PRODUCTION CO. ARGOSY PICTURES / PRINT COURTESY: UCLA FILM & TELEVISION ARCHIVE / RIGHTS: PARAMOUNT PICTURES

‘One of the biggest commercial successes of his career, The Quiet Man remains among Ford’s – and John Wayne’s – most beloved works today. The tale of an American escaping from his country, and from a dark past, to make a new home in his ancestral Ireland was an intensely personal project for Ford, nurtured by the director since the late 1930s. Ford’s fascination with small town community and his own Irish heritage animates the film’s almost anthropological attention to the smallest details of domestic space, rural and religious customs and vernacular language. A wonderfully expressive color film, The quiet man uses its vivid Technicolor palette to lend a radiant, dreamlike quality to the lushly verdant Irish landscapes captured within it. The film’s predominantly nostalgic tone has led many to overlook its darker and subtly critical undertones - especially with regard to its depiction of the Church - and its innovative, unusual use of voiceover narration.’ (Harvard Film Archive)